IRISH GENIUS IN AMERICA

A project celebrating the role of the Irish and Irish Americans in creating the American system of ideas, values and social justice.                               

The creation of a unique body of original artwork, historical portraits, scholarly writing and academic studies.

   IN ASSOCIATION WITH UNIVERSITY COLLEGE CORK.  


Thomas Dongan.   Earl Of Limerick, 1634 -1715      The first Irish Genius In America in our series.  Dongan was an Irish patriot and the first Catholic Governor of New York. He established the first representative assembly in North America.  His Charter of Liberties and Privileges of 1683 marks the birth of popular government in the New World, and is generally recognized as the Magna Charta of American constitutional liberties. He gave generously of his modest assets and courageously of himself in his unfailing commitment to social justice and security for ALL OF the residents of New York, including, the Five Nation Iroquois Tribes, and for generations of Americans yet to come.


List of provisional portraits

                  View sample paintings in progress

      The Artist


IRISH GENIUS IN AMERICA.

THE GIFT OF IMPROVING THE LIVES OF OTHERS FOR GENERATIONS TO COME.

Thomas Dongan made his exemplary contribution in 1683.  He implanted an intellectual idea in a new land, an idea that was to become a major supporting principle of the Constitution of the United States.  Since then has arisen the most extraordinary lineage of selfless Irish American leaders, spanning over 300 years of struggle for individual dignity and respect, with dedication to the ideals of social justice.

2008 will mark the 325th anniversary of Donganís Charter of Liberties and Privileges. In celebration of this pivotal act and to explore and promote understanding of the extraordinary Irish Americans who followed in Donganís footsteps, the Irish Genius In America project will support the creation of a unique body of original artwork, historical portraits, scholarly writing and academic studies designed to place this inspirational and vibrant history permanently in the eyes of the public, particularly the young. 

In the words of Charles Carroll of Carrollton, Maryland, who signed the Declaration of Independence:                                                                                                              Who are deserving of immortality?Ö         They who have rendered great, essential and disinterested benefits to their country.

 

Last edited: April 2010 CONTACT Web: Trevor Goring